Metadata and Copyright, Part IV

This is the fourth and final part in my series about image metadata and copyright. You can find part I here, part II here, and part III here. So you’ve been conscientiously adding copyright and contact information to all of your images as I suggested in the previous articles, but what happens to their metadata when you upload them to …

Metadata and Copyright: My Lightroom Workflow, Part III

This is the third in a series of posts describing how I use Adobe Lightroom to manage the metadata of my photos.¬†Part I is here¬†and Part II is here. In the first parts of this series I’ve shown how to ensure that your photos always contain the correct metadata pertaining to copyright ad contact information. In this final post, I …

On Perspective and Focal Length

A few days ago, I had the unfortunate idea of engaging in an online debate about the effect of focal length on perspective in photographs. By now you’d think I would have learned that those exchanges rarely result in anybody changing their minds, even when presented with unequivocal visual demonstration of how wrong they are. Anyway, I had all but …

The Rules Of Composition

… or how composition rules. Or not. Didn’t feel much like shooting this week, the Muse wasn’t visiting much or at all, so I asked her why and she told me she was feeling the burden of me having to think so hard about all those rules and that I should just let go and play! If you set out …

Pouring Wine

By way of the Photoshelter blog, I just came upon the work of Ryan Matthew Smith. he is the photographer behind most of the pictures contained in the book Modernist Cuisine: The Art and Science of Cooking. If you have an interest in food that looks and tastes great, you should probably buy it, but given my limited penchant for …

High Speed Flash Photography How-To

Recently I’ve been doing some experiments with high speed flash photography and wanted to share the method I used with my readers here. While I still have a lot to learn in this field, I am getting good results by following the steps I have outlined below and using a modicum of reasonably priced equipment. What you need: A camera. …

The Inverse Square Law, explained

Most photographers using artificial lighting know about the Inverse Square Law, namely the fact that light intensity decreases according to the square of the distance between the light source and the subject. This is important for two reasons: The farther your subject is from the light source, the more power you must use to light it, and Light falls off …